Peloton Forum banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello!
So when the delivery team came in to set it all up, they asked if I wanted them to set up the cleats and I said sure! Below is a picture.... I think something is very wrong! No pain from either my wife or me but I just feel like they aren’t very straight? Idk they look really weird... help!
116
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
46 Posts
Bicycle cleats are adjustable in all directions on purpose, because everyone has different anatomically shaped feet, so these are not necessarily wrong. Depending on your anatomical shape and cycling stride, your cleats may not even mirror the other foot. Do a search, and you'll find many articles on how to properly setup your cleat positions.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
491 Posts
Hi. There is some variability based on your pedal stroke. In general, good form is to have your toes pointed forward while you pedal. When I attach cleats I generally point the top towards the very front point of the shoe.

Another note is that you can adjust how tight or loose the pedals are with an allen wrench and the screw in back of the pedal.

Those pairs both look a bit off to me but the ones on the left look worse. Those look like you might be pointing in your toes towards the bike while you pedal which probably wouldn't be healthy or comfortable.

Here's a video about installing and adjusting your cleats.

Welcome and let us know if this doesn't help.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
132 Posts
Those don't look right to me and they also don't look like they're symmetrical. For a given pair of shoes the cleats should be set up symmetrically. It's possible they may not have tightened the screws and the cleats are slipping around.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
491 Posts
Forgot to include the link to the page with the video!

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Bicycle cleats are adjustable in all directions on purpose, because everyone has different anatomically shaped feet, so these are not necessarily wrong. Depending on your anatomical shape and cycling stride, your cleats may not even mirror the other foot. Do a search, and you'll find many articles on how to properly setup your cleat positions.
That’s is not accurate info - the installer would not address anatomical differences in feet or pedal stroke. You would need a professional session to get that level of adjustment. It looks like he simply quickly eyeballed it and screwed them on. They also could be moving if not tight. All things that should be addressed. Incorrect cleat position will lead to inefficient pedal stroke, poor power transfer and sore knees eventually. Google how to do it - a neutral forward position best for most. Check them often for movement.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
46 Posts
That’s is not accurate info - the installer would not address anatomical differences in feet or pedal stroke. You would need a professional session to get that level of adjustment. It looks like he simply quickly eyeballed it and screwed them on. They also could be moving if not tight. All things that should be addressed. Incorrect cleat position will lead to inefficient pedal stroke, poor power transfer and sore knees eventually. Google how to do it - a neutral forward position best for most. Check them often for movement.
I never said that the installer, or whomever, installed them correctly. If anything, I agree that they were eyeballed on. What I was noting is that it's not necessary that his cleats match the same positioning as his wife's cleats and/or that cleats don't necessarily need to be straight or symmetrical, as everyones' cleat positioning should be relatively unique to themselves and even to their own individual foot. Thus, why I suggested the OP do a search on how to properly set up his cleats.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
That’s is not accurate info - the installer would not address anatomical differences in feet or pedal stroke. You would need a professional session to get that level of adjustment. It looks like he simply quickly eyeballed it and screwed them on. They also could be moving if not tight. All things that should be addressed. Incorrect cleat position will lead to inefficient pedal stroke, poor power transfer and sore knees eventually. Google how to do it - a neutral forward position best for most. Check them often for movement.
I never said that the installer, or whomever, installed them correctly. If anything, I agree that they were eyeballed on. What I was noting is that it's not necessary that his cleats match the same positioning as his wife's cleats and/or that cleats don't necessarily need to be straight or symmetrical, as everyones' cleat positioning should be relatively unique to themselves and even to their own individual foot. Thus, why I suggested the OP do a search on how to properly set up his cleats.
I was referring to your statement about not mirroring the other side - I agree they do not need to match his wife but I think they do need to be symmetrical on each pair and pointing fairly straight ahead as that is what you are clipping into - most Look cleats have a degree float inward/outward to allow for natural alignment adjustments as you pedal.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
46 Posts
I was referring to your statement about not mirroring the other side - I agree they do not need to match his wife but I think they do need to be symmetrical on each pair and pointing fairly straight ahead as that is what you are clipping into - most Look cleats have a degree float inward/outward to allow for natural alignment adjustments as you pedal.
I hear what you're saying, but I still respectfully disagree. Cleats on the same pair do not have to be symmetrical/mirrored, since almost everyone's feet are not symmetrical. My left foot is 3/4 sizes smaller than my right foot, so my cleats are not set symmetrically. I use both SPD and Look Delta cleats. With that said, you don't need to be too nitpicky if you have a fair amount of float, which you mentioned. (The red Look Delta cleats that come with the Peloton branded shoes in the OP's case, have 9 degrees of float, which for most is enough to overcome slight improper cleat positioning) Maybe, if I'm understanding correctly, your point is that most riders will have a cleat mount that is close to symmetrical with the Peloton shoes, since they offer a fair amount of float? But even so, that doesn't mean the cleats are fitted properly, and there will be some feet out there that need asymmetrical cleat mounting, more so in extreme cases.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Is this something that should be done on delivery? I just got my bike and this was not done. I am new to all this so wasn't aware they should be adjusted
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
46 Posts
Is this something that should be done on delivery? I just got my bike and this was not done. I am new to all this so wasn't aware they should be adjusted
As far as I know, the cleats will come mounted already, or the delivery team will just mount the cleats on for you. They won't do any precision fitting. Do a search on how to properly mount cleats. You can do a pretty good job yourself. If you really want to get uber-precise you can have a pro watch you and set it for you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
As far as I know, the cleats will come mounted already, or the delivery team will just mount the cleats on for you. They won't do any precision fitting. Do a search on how to properly mount cleats. You can do a pretty good job yourself. If you really want to get uber-precise you can have a pro watch you and set it for you.
Thank you
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top