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Hi, I am new to Peloton. I consider myself fairly fit but I'm new to spinning. How do I increase my cadence? I have been doing a daily 20-30 minute ride class for 3 weeks and I don't want to attempt more challenging classes until I have mastered the basics. My overall output is decent but I have trouble reaching the higher cadences suggested in class, even with lowering the resistance. Is there a way to gradually increase cadence? I feel like I am cycling (fast), rather than spinning. I can get up there for a few seconds – are there any tricks to be able to consistently ride that fast or is it just a case of more practice? Do I need "rest days" perhaps? I would be grateful for any advice/tips!
 

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You need to learn the technical side of biking. Matt Wilpers and Christine D'Ericole classes are very good for teaching these. You need to learn how to use all your leg muscles, not just your quads; and use them in a smooth natural flow (it's what a lot of instructors refer to as a full circle pedal stroke)
 

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Discussion Starter #3
You need to learn the technical side of biking. Matt Wilpers and Christine D'Ericole classes are very good for teaching these. You need to learn how to use all your leg muscles, not just your quads; and use them in a smooth natural flow (it's what a lot of instructors refer to as a full circle pedal stroke)
Thank you! I’ll try it! 😊
 

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I don't think you necessarily need rest days but you shouldn't go al out every day. Mix in some low impact rides or easier rides. I would also suggest trying to get your cadence up to the bottom of the zone they're calling out and seeing how long you can stay there. Over time you will be able to maintain it:)
 

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Hi, bike fitness is much different than overall fitness. It's great that you are ahead of the game in physical fitness in that your heart and lungs are in good shape. However, "bike muscles" can only be developed on a bike so keep pedaling. Also, more pedaling improves your pedal stroke and that makes you more efficient too. A decent fitness rider, not talking a pro racer here, pedals in the low 80s to low 90s on flat ground so that is a good general target. For me, flat ground on the Peloton is a resistance of about 38. I find it actually harder to pedal well and with good form if there is too little resistance on the pedals, my legs just spin out of control. Put a little "road" under your feet, just enough resistance to feel the pedal all the way around, work on good form, and you will naturally see an increase in your cadence. Matt and Christine have some great classes where they work on pedal stroke. In my opinion as an experienced road biker, Christine has one of the nicest pedal strokes out there. Watch how her feet go around, it really is just perfect. If you get a chance, google her on a track bike, perfect form. One last point, some people are mashers, hi resistance low cadence. Others do well high cadence low resistance. Find your own place.
 

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Denis Morton also teaches classes where he focuses on the mechanics of the pedal stroke. Not as difficult or as technical/refined as Matt or Christine, but probably good if you're a beginner to learning cycling efficiency.
 
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