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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I started my peloton journey in November and got stuck in beginners classes because the rest were too hard. Then comes the power zone training where I could work at my own pace and still be challenged.

Then I decided to go to a "normal" ride called a cool down ride. It was in my zone 3-4 and even 5. Is there a way to convert the other rides to power zones? Has anyone else found this to be tough? I find myself out of breath on what they consider a "recovery" ride. Maybe I'm just paying too much attention to the numbers...
Ideas? Advice?
 

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I started my peloton journey in November and got stuck in beginners classes because the rest were too hard. Then comes the power zone training where I could work at my own pace and still be challenged.

Then I decided to go to a "normal" ride called a cool down ride. It was in my zone 3-4 and even 5. Is there a way to convert the other rides to power zones? Has anyone else found this to be tough? I find myself out of breath on what they consider a "recovery" ride. Maybe I'm just paying too much attention to the numbers...
Ideas? Advice?
Hi! There's no way you should be above Zone 3 and higher in a cool down ride. One thing about Peloton that's tough is that there is a pretty narrow range of output they're calling for given how different people are for all kinds of reasons.

First of all don't get discouraged. All of the instructors say periodically that it's important to "modify." If you're having a hard time doing the cadence and resistance they're calling for do what works for you like subtract 10 or 15 from the bottom of the resistance range throughout the class. If you're doing -10, when they say 40-45, you do 30, etc. As you feel stronger, reduce the amount you are below the bottom of the range.

The main thing is that you are getting a good workout, getting your heart rate up, etc.

Let us know if that works:)
 

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Are you able to keep up with the cadence if the resistance is low enough or is cadence also a challenge regardless of resistance?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Are you able to keep up with the cadence if the resistance is low enough or is cadence also a challenge regardless of resistance?
If the resistance is 25-35 I can do the cadence they call for 80-100. Once they ask for 35+ it's really tough.
Hi! There's no way you should be above Zone 3 and higher in a cool down ride. One thing about Peloton that's tough is that there is a pretty narrow range of output they're calling for given how different people are for all kinds of reasons.

First of all don't get discouraged. All of the instructors say periodically that it's important to "modify." If you're having a hard time doing the cadence and resistance they're calling for do what works for you like subtract 10 or 15 from the bottom of the resistance range throughout the class. If you're doing -10, when they say 40-45, you do 30, etc. As you feel stronger, reduce the amount you are below the bottom of the range.

The main thing is that you are getting a good workout, getting your heart rate up, etc.

Let us know if that works:)
I don't know why I feel so bad when I can't give them what they are asking for. I need to be ok with modifying just like I do for yoga moves. I'm just frustrated when they say you should be able to hold a conversation at this cadence & resistance and I'm over here huffing and puffing. I did drop the resistance tonight to where the cadence was attainable I think I was about 10 below what they were asking for.
 

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If the resistance is 25-35 I can do the cadence they call for 80-100. Once they ask for 35+ it's really tough.

I don't know why I feel so bad when I can't give them what they are asking for. I need to be ok with modifying just like I do for yoga moves. I'm just frustrated when they say you should be able to hold a conversation at this cadence & resistance and I'm over here huffing and puffing. I did drop the resistance tonight to where the cadence was attainable I think I was about 10 below what they were asking for.
That's good! I've heard Emma asked before what to do if you can't meet the ranges and she also suggested alternating being in the zone for cadence or resistance but not at the same time so that's another thing you can try.

It will get easier and as long as you're getting a good workout and getting stronger you're doing it right:)
 

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I started my peloton journey in November and got stuck in beginners classes because the rest were too hard. Then comes the power zone training where I could work at my own pace and still be challenged.

Then I decided to go to a "normal" ride called a cool down ride. It was in my zone 3-4 and even 5. Is there a way to convert the other rides to power zones? Has anyone else found this to be tough? I find myself out of breath on what they consider a "recovery" ride. Maybe I'm just paying too much attention to the numbers...
Ideas? Advice?
Good advice below, don't get discouraged!!! Regular rides provide a range of cadence and resistance that works for MOST people but not all. We are all built differently. I suggest that you take a powerzone FTP test and give the test your best effort. Do the test with one of the instructors you align the most with. For example, I love Olivia but she is a tiny person where I am a larger experienced road biker. I push my watts from resistance where Olivia pushes watts from cadence. I do better riding with Christine who is built more like me and gets her power from resistance. When you take the FTP test, give it all you got. When done with the 20 minute test you should feel like if it were 21 minutes you would fall off of the bike. This will then accurately set your powerzones on the bike. The best thing about powerzones is that they are designed SPECIFICALLY for you, unlike regular rides which provide a range. You and I could work out together say in powerzone 3 and we would both be getting the same workout because your zone 3 is yours and my zone 3 is mine. Once you know your zones, you can adapt them to any ride. When you do a cool down ride, forget the cadence/resistance given by the instructor, just stay in powerzone 1 or 2. If you take a ride where the instructor is talking about a moderate workout, stay in powerzone 2 or 3. If the instructor is telling you to push, go to zones 4 or 5. For me though, once my powerzones were set, I rarely do anything other than powerzone rides. Once the powerzone workouts start to get easier, retake the FTP test and you will be surprised how much your numbers go up. One other thing, find a pedal cadence that works for you. I like to ride at 87 RPM. This will make things much more comfortable, but still vary cadence from time to time. Last point, take a powerzone beginner ride, I suggest the 20 minute powerzone beginner ride done by Matt on 1/2/21, lots of good information. Do this first. Hope this was helpful.
 
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